THE LIMITS OF MARITIME JURISDICTION

Clive Schofield (University of Wollongong, Australia), Seokwoo Lee (Inha University Law School, Corea del Sur) y Moon-Sang Kwon (Kyunghee University, Corea del Sur) – Editores

Leiden, Holanda. BRILL. ISBN. 9789004262584. 2013. XVIII, 794 págs. Encuadernado.

 

PVP EUR 249,00 (4% IVA incluido)

Esta nueva monografía sobre los límites de la jurisdicción marítima recopila 36 artículos nuevos, escritos por expertos en la materia, y con tres editores que trabajan en centros de referencia mundialmente reconocidos, como son el Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS), el Inha Internacional Ocean Law Centre y el Ocean Policy Institute, del Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST).

 

Está dedicado a la definición de los límites marítimos en cuanto al espacio y los límites de la jurisdicción legal en las zonas de conflictos marítimos. Los trabajon tratan de materias como las disputas fronterizas, el acceso a los valiosos recursos marítimos, la jurisdicción de las aguas polares o el impacto del cambio climático en los océanos.

Ofrece, por lo tanto, un análisis crítico de un amplio rango de materias relacionados con el derecho del mar y con el derecho de las fronteras marítimas.

 

 

Extracto del índice:

Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

Preface and Acknowledgements

Introduction: Exploring the Limits of Maritime Jurisdiction

A Jurisprudence of Pragmatic Altruism: Jon Van Dyke’s Legacy to Legal Scholarship Harry N. Scheiber

PART I: ON THE LIMITS OF MARITIME JURISDICTION

Chapter 1: The Limits of Maritime Jurisdictionby Ivan Shearer

Chapter 2: The ‘Territorialisation’ of the Exclusive Economic Zone: A Requiem for the Remnants of the Freedom of the Seas?

PART II: DISPUTED LIMITS

Chapter 3: The Role of Islands in the Generation of Boundaries at Sea

Chapter 4: The El Dorado Effect: Reappraising the ‘Oil Factor’ in Maritime Boundary Disputes

Chapter 5: Oil and Water: Assessing the Link between Maritime Boundary Delimitation and Hydrocarbon Resources

Chapter 6: Adriatic Blues: Delimiting the former Yugoslavia’s Final Frontier

Chapter 7: The Scope for Unilateralism in Disputed Maritime Areas

PART III: ENDURING DISPUTES IN EAST AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

Chapter 8: Sovereignty as an Obstacle to Effective Oceans Governance – The Case of the South China Sea

Chapter 9: The South China Sea: Competing Claims and Conflict Situations

Chapter 10: Politics, International Law and the Dynamics of Recent Developments in the South China Sea

Chapter 11: The Notion of Dispute in the Contemporary International Legal Order: Qualification and Evidence

Chapter 12: Perspectives on East China Sea Maritime Disputes: Issues and Context

Chapter 13: The China-Japan Dispute Over Entitlement in the East China Sea: Legal Issues and Prospects for Resolution

PART IV: MARITIME SECURITY AND THE LIMITS OF MARITIME JURISDICTION

Chapter 14: Maritime Security in the post-9/11 World: A New Creeping Jurisdiction in the Law of the Sea?

Chapter 15: Maritime Security and Jurisdiction over Pirates and Maritime Terrorists

Chapter 16: Korea’s Trial of Somali Pirates

Chapter 17: A Missing Part of the Law of the Sea Convention: Addressing Issues of State Jurisdiction over Persons at Sea”

PART V: PUSHING THE LIMITS OF OCEANS GOVERNANCE – ENVIRONMENTAL AND MARINE LIVING RESOURCE CONCERNS

Chapter 18: Distributing a Conservation Burden across Multiple Jurisdictions: A Case Study of the Western and Central Pacific Tuna Fisheries

Chapter 19: In Combating and Deterring IUU Fishing: Do RFMOs Work?

Chapter 20: “Good Faith” Obligations to Protect and Preserve the Marine Environment: A Proposal on Uniform High Seas Fisheries Management

Chapter 21: The Legacy and Fate of Bluefin Tuna under International Law

PART VI: POLAR LIMITS

Chapter 22: The Southern Ocean, Climate Change and Ocean Governance

Chapter 23: Whaling in the Antarctic: Protecting Rights in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction through International Litigation

Chapter 24: Marine Protected Areas in Antarctic Waters: A Review of Policy Options in the Context of International Law

Chapter 25: Evaluating Canada’s Position on the Northwest Passage in Light of Two Possible Sources of International Protection

Chapter 26: The Practicalities of Ecosystem Approach in the Barents Sea: The ECOBAR Project

PART VII: NEW CHALLENGES IN OCEANS GOVERNANCE – CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE OCEANS

Chapter 27: Sea Level Rise and the Law of the Sea: How Can the Affected States be Better Protected?

Chapter 28: Ocean Energy Development in Response to the Convention on Climate Change: The Case of Korea

Chapter 29: Exploiting the Oceans for Climate Change Mitigation: Case Study on Iron Fertilisation

Chapter 30: Through the Back Door: A Critical Appraisal of the UN Law of the Sea Convention’s Usefulness as a Tool to Combat Climate Change

Chapter 31: Principles and Normative Trends in EU Ocean Governance

PART VIII: BEYOND THE LIMITS – EXPLORING AND MANAGING NEW FRONTIERS

Chapter 32: Governing the Blue: Governance of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction in the Twenty-First Century by David Freestone

Chapter 33: Beyond Delimitation: Interaction Between the Outer Continental Shelf and High Seas Regimes

Chapter 34: Addressing the Marine Genetic Resources Issue: Is the Debate Heading in the Wrong Direction?

Index

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